Teleseminars and Web Events


Teleseminars

Title
Early Intervention Matters:
How Addressing Chronic Absence Can Reduce Dropout Rates
date
May 24, 2013
Presenter(s)
  • Ms. Hedy Chang
    Director Attendance Works. Hedy Chang has spent more than two decades working in the fields of family support, family economic success, and education and child development. In February 2013, Hedy was named by the White House as a “Champion of Change” for her commitment to furthering African American Education.
  • Ms.Cecelia Leong
    Associate Director Attendance Works. Cecelia Leong has, for the past 12 years, used her skills as a writer, researcher and evaluator to document innovation and best practice on issues affecting children, youth and their families. In addition to facilitating peer-to-peer sharing between researchers, practitioners and consultants through the Peer Learning Network, Cecelia works to identify emerging technical assistance needs in reducing chronic absence and innovative tools to address those needs.
Description
Chronic absence—missing 10% or more of school for any reason regardless of whether absences are excused or unexcused—is a red alert that students are headed for academic trouble and eventually for dropping out of high school. Nationwide, as many as 7.5 million students miss nearly a month of school every year. In some cities, as many as one in four are missing that much school. Contrary to popular perception, poor attendance isn’t just a problem in high school. It can start as early as kindergarten. Every year, one in 10 kindergarten and first grade students miss a month of school with excused or unexcused absences. Starting in kindergarten, research shows these absences can affect academic achievement, especially for low-income students unable to make up for lost time. Chronic absence can set a pattern of poor attendance and academic failure for older students, fueling the dropout rate.

Attendance Works is a national and state initiative that promotes better policy and practice around school attendance. The organization promotes tracking chronic absence data for each student beginning in kindergarten, or ideally earlier, as a key indicator for early identification and intervention.

Webinar participants will learn what the most recent national and state research says about the impact of chronic absence on key educational milestones, hear about successful efforts to turn around poor attendance and preliminary insights into what may be causing higher rates of absenteeism among students with disabilities.




Title
STAYING THE COURSE
Sustainability of Dropout Prevention Efforts in a Large Urban School District: Teaming, Action Planning, Implementation, Evaluation, and Celebration!
date
November 15, 2012
Presenter(s)
  • Ms. Robin J. Morrison
    Instructional Supervisor and Clinical Behavioral Services for Miami-Dade County Public Schools
Description
Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) is the fourth largest school district in the nation and for the past six years, M-DCPS, in collaboration with the National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities (NDPC-SD), has worked intensively to decrease the dropout rate for students with disabilities.

Since 2006, Miami-Dade's graduation rate for students with disabilities has increased from 36% to 57% and the district's dropout rate for students with disabilities has decreased from 10.2% to 6%. Many steps were taken to achieve these outcomes that include the coordination of information and resources regarding related predictors and indicators throughout the district to initiate dropout prevention strategies.

This webinar discusses the training and technical assistance provided to schools utilizing the NDPC-SD's Dropout Prevention Intervention Framework. The District's key strategies and protocols for developing and implementing action plans based on data analysis, monitoring and evaluating progress, and celebrating student and school successes are discussed.

Overall, thirty-four selected high schools have reduced the number of students with IEPs who drop out of school. In addition to these results, specific strategies are shared that aided in the increased number of students with emotional/behavioral disabilities that remained in school.

Audio/Video

Title
GraduateFIRST: The Dropout Prevent Destination
date
February 28, 2011
Presenter(s)
  • Laura C. Brown, Ph.D.
    Coordinator of Georgia's GraduateFIRST Program
Description
Improving graduation rates have factored into political, economic, and education discussions because earning a high school diploma has been described as having individual and community economic benefit. However, even with educational reforms, dropout rates in some communities remain high. Schools often find addressing the challenges associated with improving graduation rates to be difficult, but for students with disabilities, the challenges can be even more complex. Georgia's GraduateFIRST initiative is designed to help students with disabilities and other students who are struggling stay in school and graduate.

Funded by Georgia's State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG), GraduateFIRST is based on a data driven intervention framework developed by the National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities. This webinar will highlight how school-based teams and team leaders diagnose causes of dropout and develop site-specific plans and strategies. Schools participating in GraduateFIRST are having success using tools and resources for monitoring and supporting students at-risk for dropping out. School teams are supported with on-going coaching, training, and technical assistance. Webinar participants will hear how schools have redesigned programs, adopted new practices, and implemented research-based strategies to become highly successful in preventing students with disabilities from dropping out. Currently, 145 middle and high schools across Georgia are participating with over 4000 students being monitored through this initiative. Engaging students, families, schools, and communities has been a common theme. GraduateFIRST results, best practices, challenges, and lessons learned will be shared.

Audio/Video

External Resources

Title
Building Early Warning Systems to Identify Students with Disabilities at Risk for Dropping out of High School and Monitoring their Response to Intervention
date
April 12, 2011
Presenter(s)
  • Mindee O'Cummings, Ph.D.
    Special Education Coordinator and Technical Assistance Liaison for the National High School Center at the American Institutes for Research in Washington, DC.
Description
Early warning systems serve to enable educators to shine light on exact indicators that are at the tipping point of student success, looking across those variables as attendance, academic performance, and course completion, focusing on ninth grade and transition points within middle school. It serves as a mechanism for pulling together disparate data and sharing it with classroom teachers who would not otherwise take the opportunity or the time to do so. This presentation is an overview of the evolution of the Early Warning System Tools, its implementation process, and the National High School Center Early Warning System Tool Version 2.0.

Audio/Video

External Resources

Title
Strategies to Increase School Completion Rates for Students with or at risk for Emotional/Behavioral Disorders
date
August 20, 2010 from 12:00 - 1:30 pm Eastern
Presenter(s)
  • Tim Lewis, Ph.D.
    Professor of Special Education, University of Missouri; Co-Director, OSEP Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports; Co-Director, Center for Adolescent Research in Schools
Description
Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (EBD) continue to demonstrate the worse post-secondary outcomes among all groups of students in part due to the large dropout rate. While progress toward improving services and lessening risk for these students is slow, there are promising practices emerging in the literature. This webinar will focus on two current federally funded Centers that are focusing on prevention and intervention among high school students at risk for school failure due to problem behavior. First, the need for consistent pro-active environmental supports across a continuum will be discussed through School-wide Positive Behavior Supports. Second, preliminary work will be presented from a recently funded research center focusing specifically on students with EBD within high schools. Participants will be provided with big ideas and essential features as well as directed to available resources to assist them in their implementation efforts.

Audio/Video

Title
Supporting Adolescent English Language Learners Through Response to Intervention (RTI)
date
May 27, 2010 from 12:00 - 1:30 pm Eastern
Presenter(s)
  • Dr. Janette Klingner, Associate Professor of Bilingual Special Education at the University of Colorado at Boulder
Description
From May 27th through June 10th, please join Dr. Janette Klingner for an online discussion surrounding the May 27th teleseminar, Supporting Adolescent English Language Learners Through Response to Intervention (RTI). The online discussion is open to all, and will provide teleseminar participants with an opportunity to discuss their questions and concerns with Dr. Klingner and colleagues from across the country. Post questions ahead of time or ask follow up questions after the teleseminar is over. If you are unable to attend the teleseminar, you'll be able to access a free recording and transcript of the event.

Latino schooling in the U.S. has long been characterized by over-representation in learning disabilities and speech disorders, high dropout rates and low college entrance and completion rates. The problems have moderated over time, but a persistent educational attainment gap remains for English language learners (ELLs). Over the last few years, the student population at Mid-City High School has changed dramatically. The school is located in what once was a mostly middle class White neighborhood and is now predominantly working class and culturally and linguistically diverse. Student mobility is high, with new students arriving during the year, many of them immigrants with little knowledge of English. Other English language learners (ELLs) have been attending schools in the district for several years, yet still do not demonstrate full English proficiency. Becoming frustrated by the students' lack of progress and the high dropout rates among youth with and without disabilities, the staff established a plan for improving instruction for their ELLs. The centerpiece of their plan is a Response to Intervention (RTI) model. As part of this effort, they are targeting ELLs' vocabulary development and reading comprehension. In this seminar, Dr. Klingner will discuss challenges faced by the staff at Mid-City High School and ways they addressed these challenges.

Audio

Title
Building Positive Relationships to Prevent Drop-Out and Other Negative Outcomes
date
October 28, 2009
Presenter(s)
  • Dr. Melissa Stormont, Associate Professor of Special Education at the University of Missouri
Description
Factors that are associated with successfully transitioning into adulthood include staying in school through graduation, avoiding teenage pregnancy, remaining drug and alcohol free, and obtaining linkages to postsecondary education, living, and employment. These tasks are accomplished through learning the social and academic skills needed to successfully navigate life demands within and outside of school settings. For children and youth with disabilities, building positive relationships are integral in this process. This teleseminar will include specific examples of research-based strategies for enhancing students’ relationships with teachers and peers. Strategies for fostering collaborative relationships with families to enhance positive interactions at home will also be presented. Finally, the importance of outreach to specific groups of students with disabilities who have very negative outcomes, including youth who are in foster care and those who are homeless, will be discussed.

Title
Research-based Strategies for Dropout Prevention
date
December 10, 2008
Presenter(s)
  • Dr. Russell W. Rumberger, Director, California Dropout Research Project, University of California, Santa Barbara
Description
For society as a whole, helping youth stay in and complete high school is a worthwhile objective. To enable schools across America to achieve this objective, practical recommendations and strategies based upon the best research evidence available are necessary. In September 2008, the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance’s released a practice guide entitled “Dropout Prevention.” Relying heavily on research studies that have evaluated evidence supporting dropout prevention programs, practices and strategies that meet the “gold standard” of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC), the guide is intended to be helpful to high school and middle school educators, superintendents, school boards, and state policymakers as they design and carry out dropout prevention strategies. Dr. Russell W. Rumberger, a 25-year expert on school dropout and Director of the California Dropout Research Project, is co-author of the practice guide. During this telephone seminar, Dr. Rumberger will present background information about the guide and discuss, in detail, each of the six evidence-based recommendations for reducing dropout rates that emerged from their evaluations. He will conclude by talking about how a comprehensive strategy to increase student engagement, using multiple approaches, will bring about the greatest success in reducing dropout rates.

Dr. Russell W. Rumberger will present background information about the recently released IES Dropout Prevention Practice Guide and discuss, in detail, each of the six evidence-based recommendations for reducing dropout rates that emerged from the authors’ evaluations.

Audio

Title
Engaging Students with School: The Essential Dimension of Dropout Prevention Programs
date
January 22, 2008
Presenter(s)
  • Sandra L. Christenson, Ph.D. Professor, Educational Psychology, University of Minnesota
Description
Student engagement with school, a multidimensional construct, is considered the primary theoretical model for understanding dropout and is, quite frankly, the bottom line in interventions to promote school completion. Variously described as a commitment to and investment in learning, identification and belonging at school, participation in the school environment, and initiation of an activity to accomplish an outcome, engagement is associated with desired academic, social, and emotional learning outcomes. Based on the implementation of Check & Connect, a model to promote students' engagement with school, reduce dropout, and increase school completion, as well as a review of the literature since 1990, four subtypes of engagement have emerged: academic, behavioral, cognitive, and psychological (affective). In this Webseminar, Dr. Christenson will describe universal and individualized interventions for students with and without disabilities. Viewing engagement as comprised of four subtypes, Dr. Christenson will explain the ideal heuristic to achieve an assessment-to-intervention link, as well as data-based interventions that maximize the goodness of the personenvironment fit. Additionally, Dr. Christenson will discuss effective interventions for students at risk of educational failure with a focus on more than attendance and academic skills, but also on indicators of students’ commitment to learning, perceptions of academic and social competence, and the sense of belonging by educators and parents.

The National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities is funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs Cooperative Agreement No. H326Q030002. The content  herein does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Education, nor does mention of other organizations imply endorsement by those organizations or the U.S. government.

Audio

Title
The Impact of Policies and Procedures on Dropout and School Completion
date
October 16, 2007
Presenter(s)
  • Dr. Loujeania Bost , Director, National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities
  • Dr. Matthew Klare, Research Associate, National Dropout Prevention Center for Students with Disabilities
Description
Multiple factors influence school completion, including state and district internal policies and practices. Such policies and procedures can greatly impact school holding power and school-completion rates. At the local level, even within districts that focus on school completion, competing structures of policies (professional development, attendance, testing, or mandated curricula) may interfere with school completion. This teleseminar examined selected policies and proposed remedies implemented by several education agencies. It is designed for state and local education agency personnel, policymakers and others concerned with policies that impact school completion. This Teleseminar took place on October 16, 2007.

Audio

Previous Teleseminars and Web Events